Marine Technology Showcase

The Pacific Northwest boasts an impressive number of marine research institutions and commercial enterprises, including leading research universities, major ports, state and federal research facilities, interest groups with a strong connection to the marine environment, and a concentration of marine sector innovators.  The Marine Technology Showcase being held April 11 in Newport will display the region’s notable contributions to marine technology and provide a forum for dialogue between the producers, promoters, and consumers of marine technology.

Marine Technology Society (MTS) President-elect Rick Spinrad, Vice President of Research at Oregon State University, comments, “Newport and the central Oregon coast are quickly becoming a critical center for marine technology developments. This showcase provides a unique and exciting look into some of the most innovative capabilities emerging from regional marine industries.”

The showcase is being sponsored by the Oregon Chapter of the MTS, comprised of marine science professionals from throughout the state. “The Marine Technology Society is a leader in convening and demonstrating new technologies around the world. We are pleased to provide this first ever opportunity for sharing these technologies with a broad Oregon audience.” explained Jeremy Childress, chair of MTS Oregon and Manager/Designer at The Sexton Corporation, a manufacturer of custom underwater products in Salem. The Marine Technology Showcase will take place April 11 from 4 to 7 pm at the Agate Beach Best Western in Newport, OR and provide opportunities for 30 plus companies and organizations, as well as students from the Pacific Northwest, to showcase their contributions to marine science and technology.

Members of the press will be admitted 30 minutes prior to the opening of the showcase for an exclusive preview.  The event coincides with the Marine Science Day at Hatfield Marine Science Center which will be held on Saturday, April 12th.

Conference sponsorships and exhibiting opportunities are currently available. Contact Amy Clark (amy@thesextonco.com) or visit MTS Oregon Showcase page for more information.

The Marine Technology Showcase is sponsored by MTS Oregon.

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Ocean Observatories off Oregon Coast

The Pacific Ocean off of Oregon and Washington are home to a new cabled array of observatories being funded by the National Science Foundation. The Ocean Observing Systems Committee of the Marine Technology Society reports some news of interest to those who are following this amazing development. They share an email from Chief Scientist John Delaney who is currently at sea in the midst of the activities…
From:John Delaney [mailto:jdelaney@uw.edu]
Sent: Monday, July 15, 2013 6:25 PM

At present I am at sea for the next 5 weeks… we are implementing the Secondary Infrastructure associated with the OOI Cabled Ocean Observing Network System and I am pretty fully committed to the activities out here off-shore.

I am passing along to you some links that may allow you to see what is going on.

I wanted to share with you the activities unfolding in the arena of U.S. Cabled Observatories.  We are off-shore Washington-Oregon deploying elements of the RSN – NEPTUNE System.  You may find it interesting to follow some of the action at the web site:

http://www.interactiveoceans.washington.edu

Or more specifically, the material from the Cruise that will continue into the end of August:

http://www.interactiveoceans.washington.edu/story/VISIONS+13

It is my hope that folks from across the country, indeed the world, will eventually become involved in using the capabilities we are developing to be persistently present throughout entire volumes of the Ocean and its underlying crust.  The hardwired nature of this effort – linked to the Internet may be a powerful stimulus for public engagement.

John

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Miami marine science leader named director of OSU’s Hatfield center

CORVALLIS, Ore. – One of the nation’s leading marine science education and research facilities is getting a new director.

Robert K. Cowen, a marine biologist and administrator from Miami, Fla., has been named director of Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. He succeeds George Boehlert, who recently retired.

Janet Webster will continue serving as interim director of the center until Cowen begins his duties in late July.

Cowen holds the Robert C. Maytag Chair of Ichthyology at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, where he has served on the faculty since 1998. He previously was on the faculty of State University of New York at Stony Brook and conducted research as a doctoral student at Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, Calif.

“Bob Cowen has marine science education and research experience on both coasts and is well-suited to lead the Hatfield Marine Science Center into the future,” said Richard Spinrad, OSU’s vice president for research. “That future could include the development of a cohesive marine science-based curriculum as well as continuing to expand the center’s robust research and public outreach missions.”

Cowen’s studies range broadly, encompassing such issues as coastal fish ecology, fishery oceanography, larval transport and connectivity of marine organism populations. He has served on numerous national committees and panels, and is affiliated with the Partnership for Interdisciplinary Studies of Coastal Oceans (PISCO), a multi-institutional research effort led by OSU. He also has served as associate dean for research at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

“I am very enthusiastic about joining the Hatfield Marine Science Center and OSU – not only for their great reputation, but also for the huge potential for bridging marine science education and science activities across the university,” Cowen said.

OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center is located on a 49-acre site in Newport, and has a combined annual budget of about $45 million and 300 employees. Its mission includes both research and education and what makes the facility unique, officials say, is that it houses scientists and educators from OSU and several federal and agencies – a collaborative environment unmatched at most marine science facilities in the country.

Among those agencies are the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Environmental Protection Agency.

The center also includes the Cooperative Institute for Marine Resources Studies – a joint research initiative between OSU and NOAA; the university’s Marine Mammal Institute; the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station, which is the first of its kind in the country; and the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, a national leader in the development of wave energy.

“I look forward to working with all partners at Hatfield to further its education, science and public outreach missions,” Cowen said.

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Registration Now Open for Ocean Observing Conference in Newport, OR

Registration is continuing for the upcoming Newport Ocean Observing Conference in Newport, Oregon. The conference is expected to attract marine-related businesses from all over the country who will gather to learn about the growing economic opportunities presented by the burgeoning marine research activities in Newport.

Confirmed speakers will represent the Hatfield Marine Science Center, the National Science Foundation’s Ocean Observing Initiative, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Pacific Marine Operations Center, the local ports of Newport and Toledo, and businesses already located in the region that support marine research.

Newport is the fastest-growing center of marine research and education on the U.S. West Coast. This coastal town is the home of the Hatfield Marine Science Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Operations Center – Pacific, a major portion of the NSF-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative, and a wave energy test site for the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center. Newport also serves at the gateway to the ocean for the world-class marine research conducted by nearby Oregon State University. Approximately $1 billion has been invested in marine research infrastructure in the Newport area and the nearby ocean in recent years.

The Yaquina Bay Ocean Observing Initiative (YBOOI) is sponsoring the inaugural Newport Ocean Observing Conference April 30 and May 1. This event will provide opportunities for organizations and companies to explore mutually beneficial business development opportunities in the marine sciences on the Oregon coast.

“We’ll have sessions on ocean observing, port and regional infrastructure, ocean technology, and collaborative research,” explained John Lavrakas, co-chair of YBOOI and President of Advanced Research Corporation, a technology company based in Newport.

“The opening talks will identify some of the specific ocean observing activities taking place, what regional resources they use, and what resources and services they are not getting,” Lavrakas said.

Speakers for that session will include Captain Wade Blake of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Operations Center – Pacific; Dr. Jack Barth of Oregon State University speaking about the local placement of infrastructure for the National Science Foundation’s Ocean Observing Initiative; and Belinda Batten, Director of the Northwest Natural Marine Renewable Energy Center based at OSU.

The infrastructure session will describe current infrastructure that supports marine research and future plans that would benefit this field. Speakers will include Don Mann, Director of the Ports of Newport, and Bud Shoemake, Director of the nearby Port of Toledo, OR.

Lavrakas continued, “A number of companies in the region are providing leadership in ocean sensing technology. The ocean technology session will describe some of the technologies being manufactured and implemented here.” This session will feature speakers from a range of local and regional companies already serving the marine research sector in Oregon, including WET Labs of Philomath, OR; Advanced Research Corporation of Newport, OR; and Sexton Co. of Salem, OR.

The final session will focus on collaborative research, which is flourishing in the region. The value of collaboration among state and federal agencies, academia, and industry has long been recognized by Oregon marine science researchers as the key to garnering mutual benefit and encouraging stakeholder engagement. This session describes several of these collaborative efforts, using as an example the extensive collaborative fisheries research ongoing in Oregon.

Speakers in this session will include Dr. Gil Sylvia of Oregon State describing collaborative fisheries research, Waldo Wakefield of NOAA speaking about bycatch reduction programs, and a representative from Oregon Sea Grant, who works with stakeholder groups of fishermen to gather input on local issues.

The conference’s keynote speaker will be Dr. Rick Spinrad, Vice President of Research at Oregon State University in nearby Corvallis, OR. Spinrad is responsible for the university’s full portfolio of nearly $300M of research, as well as the school’s activities in commercialization, corporate development and research integrity.

The second day of the conference will consist of tours of a range of relevant facilities, including the Hatfield Marine Science Center and its ship operations, the NOAA Pacific fleet headquarters, local ports, and the Hinsdale Wave Research Lab at Oregon State University.

“This is an exciting time in Newport, and we want to share our success with new potential partners and entice them to investigate business opportunities on the beautiful Oregon coast,” Lavrakas said.

Registration information is available on YBOOI’s web site at www.ybooi.org. The conference will be held at the Hallmark Resort and at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport.

Conference sponsorships and vendor display opportunities are currently available. Contact John Lavrakas at jlavrakas@oregonarc.com for more information.

Current sponsors of the conference are the City of Newport; the City of Toledo, OR; the Ports of Newport and Toledo; CoastCom; Charter Business; the Yaquina Bay Economic Foundation; the Economic Development Alliance of Lincoln County; and Advanced Research Corporation.

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Conference on Marine Research-Related Business Opportunities to be Held in Newport

Newport, Ore — Newport, Oregon is the fastest-growing center of marine research and education on the U.S. West Coast. This coastal town is the home of the Hatfield Marine Science Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Operations Center – Pacific, a major portion of the NSF-funded Ocean Observatories Initiative, and a wave energy test site for the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center. Newport also serves at the gateway to the ocean for the world-class marine research conducted by nearby Oregon State University. Approximately $1 billion has been invested in marine research infrastructure in the Newport area and the nearby ocean in recent years.

A group that has long-advocated for exploring the economic development potential of the marine research sector is now sponsoring a major conference in Newport aimed at informing businesses and other potential partners about the opportunities that are blooming in Newport and the surrounding region.

The Yaquina Bay Ocean Observing Initiative (YBOOI) is sponsoring the inaugural Newport Ocean Observing Conference April 30 and May 1 in Newport. This event will provide opportunities for organizations and companies to explore mutually beneficial business development opportunities in the marine sciences on the Oregon coast.

The agenda will include presentations on the current state of major marine research projects on the Oregon coast, as well as local and regional infrastructure capabilities for ocean research. Presenters will include individuals from the Hatfield Marine Science Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Oregon State University, NSF’s Ocean Observatories Initiative, and the Ports of Newport and Toledo.

The keynote speaker on April 30 will be Dr. Rick Spinrad, Vice President of Research at Oregon State University in nearby Corvallis, OR. Prior to taking this position in 2010, Spinrad served as Assistant Administrator for research for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in Washington, D.C. At OSU, Spinrad is responsible for the university’s full portfolio of nearly $300M of research, as well as the school’s activities in commercialization, corporate development and research integrity.

The second day of the conference will consist of tours of a range of relevant facilities, including the Hatfield Marine Science Center and its ship operations, the NOAA Pacific fleet headquarters, and the Hinsdale Wave Research Lab at Oregon State University.

“This conference will offer a unique opportunity to learn about all the cutting-edge research centered here in Newport, as well as a chance for participants to network with key players in the science and business sectors here,” explained John Lavrakas, co-chair of YBOOI and President of Advanced Research Corporation, a technology company based in Newport.

“In addition, the tours will provide participants with a good overview of the infrastructure available to them here,” he added.

“This is an exciting time in Newport, and we want to share our success with new potential partners and entice them to investigate business opportunities on the beautiful Oregon coast,” he said.

Registration information is available on YBOOI’s web site at www.ybooi.org. The conference will be held at the Hallmark Resort and at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport.

Conference sponsorships and vendor display opportunities are currently available. Contact John Lavrakas at jlavrakas@oregonarc.com for more information.

Current sponsors of the conference are the City of Newport; the City of Toledo, OR; Charter Business; the Economic Development Alliance of Lincoln County; and Advanced Research Corporation.

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OSU Selected to Lead Project Rejuvenating U.S. Research Fleet

CORVALLIS, Ore. – The National Science Foundation has notified Oregon State University that it will be the lead institution on a project to finalize the design and coordinate the construction of as many as three new coastal research vessels to bolster the marine science research capabilities of the United States.

OSU initially will receive nearly $3 million to coordinate the design phase of the project – and if funds are appropriated for all three vessels, the total grant is projected to reach $290 million over 10 years. The final number constructed, and the geographic positioning of these vessels, will be determined by the National Science Foundation based on geographic scientific requirements and availability of funding.

If all three vessels are built, it is likely that one would be positioned on the East Coast, West Coast and Gulf Coast, officials say.

A project team led by Oregon State’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences will finalize the design for the 175-foot long, technically enhanced Regional Class ships, select a shipyard, oversee construction, and coordinate the system integration, testing, commissioning and acceptance, and transition to operations.

“These will be floating, multi-use laboratories that are flexible and can be adapted for different scientific purposes, yet are more seaworthy and environmentally ‘green’ than previous research vessels,” said Mark Abbott, dean of the OSU College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences. “These ships will be used to address critical issues related to climate change, ocean circulation, natural hazards, human health, and marine ecosystems.”

OSU vice president for research Rick Spinrad, who previously directed research programs for the U.S. Navy and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), said the new vessels would “revitalize and transform” coastal ocean science in the United States.

“Many of the most pressing issues facing our oceans are in these coastal regions, including acidification, hypoxia, tsunami prediction, declining fisheries, and harmful algal blooms,” Spinrad said. “Because of their flexibility, these new vessels will attract a broad range of users and will become ideal platforms to training early-career scientists and mariners.”

The project had the support of Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber’s Office, noted OSU President Ed Ray, who said the university will benefit from the process long before the first ship hits the water in 2019 or 2020.

“What is really unique about this project is that it will involve faculty from engineering and business, who will join their oceanography colleagues on the design and construction elements – and provide unbelievable training opportunities for OSU undergraduate and graduate students interested in project management, marine technology and marine science,” Ray pointed out.

The successful OSU proposal was submitted to the National Science Foundation by Clare Reimers, an oceanography professor, and Demian Bailey, the university’s marine superintendent. As part of that submission, OSU proposed to be the operator of the first vessel. Additional operating institutions will be determined once the total number of vessels to be built is known.

The university now operates the R/V Oceanus, an older research vessel scheduled for retirement about the time the new research vessels will become available.

“The National Science Foundation hasn’t authorized a multi-ship project since the 1970s,” Bailey said, “and these are likely the only ships scheduled by NSF to be built during the next decade – so this is a big deal. The endurance and size of the new ships will be similar to that of Oceanus and (former OSU vessel) Wecoma but they will be much more efficient and have far greater scientific capacity and flexibility.”

Bailey said the new vessels will have advanced dynamic positioning that will help them stay in place in the rugged Pacific Ocean. That is a benefit for launching and retrieving gliders and other autonomous or remotely operated vehicles, conducting precise seafloor mapping, and retrieving moorings and other instrumentation. They also will be much quieter, which will help researchers who use acoustics to study everything from endangered whales to undersea earthquakes and volcanoes.

Reimers said the first phase of the 10-year project will begin in early 2013 with the finalization of the vessel design. A concept design is already in place and the OSU project team will partner with two regional firms – The Glosten Associates in Seattle, Wash., and Science Applications International Corporation in Oregon City – to meet naval architecture, marine design and systems engineering requirements.

“These new vessels will allow scientists at sea to conduct state-of-the-art scientific research from the atmosphere above into the seafloor below our coastal oceans,” Reimers said. “Broader impacts will also be possible because these ships will be equipped with modern telecommunications technologies and sensors to be able to transmit a rich variety of observations to scientists, educators and the public ashore.”

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) praised the project and selection of OSU.

“These research ships will keep the United States in the forefront of coastal ocean science,” Wyden said. “The selection of Oregon State University to design these vessels represents an important investment in our nation’s research infrastructure and adds to the state’s already-growing reputation as a center for marine research and the place that will train the next generation of ocean scientists.”

Fellow Senator Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) described the announcement as “great news for both Oregon State University and the state of Oregon.”

“Oregon State is on the cutting edge for marine research and it is only fitting that they have received the honor of designing these new research ships,” Merkley said. “I am excited that we will be developing top-notch research into the health of our oceans and the effects of climate change through this targeted investment right here in Oregon.”

History of OSU Research Vessels

1964 – The Department of Oceanography commissions the 180-foot Yaquina

1968 – The Department of Oceanography commissions the 80-foot Cayuse

1975 – The School of Oceanography commissions the 184-foot Wecoma

2000 – The College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences commissions the 54-foot Elakha

2012 – The College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences takes over operation of the 177-foot Oceanus, formerly operated by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

About the OSU College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences: CEOAS is internationally recognized for its faculty, research and facilities, including state-of-the-art computing infrastructure to support real-time ocean/atmosphere observation and prediction. The college is a leader in the study of the Earth as an integrated system, providing scientific understanding to address complex environmental challenges.
Material from OSU Website
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Newport Selected as Home of Pacific Marine Energy Center

The Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, or NNMREC, which is based at Oregon State University, has chosen Newport, Ore., as the future site of the first utility-scale, grid-connected wave energy test site in the United States – the Pacific Marine Energy Center.

The Pacific Marine Energy Center, or PMEC, will test energy generation potential and the environmental impacts of wave energy devices, at an ocean site about five miles from shore. Subsea cables will transmit energy from the wave energy devices to the local power grid, and data to scientists and engineers at on-shore facilities.

The first installment of funding for PMEC was received in September, 2012, consisting of $4 million from the U.S. Department of Energy, along with a non-federal cost match.

“PMEC represents a major step toward the development of energy from Oregon’s ocean waters,” said Jason Busch of the Oregon Wave Energy Trust. “I’m certain that Oregon will reap benefits from PMEC for many years to come, and the research and development performed at PMEC will help usher in this new form of reliable electricity from the sea.”

PMEC design and specific site characterization will begin soon, along with the permitting and regulatory process. NNMREC will continue to work with a variety of partners to develop additional funding sources. The exact ocean location for the PMEC site will be finalized in the next few months in a zone that has been selected in collaboration with ocean stakeholders – an area that will not impede shipping lanes and takes environmental impacts into consideration.

The Pacific Marine Energy Center will have four “test berths,” open spaces of water dedicated to testing individual devices or small arrays of devices, each of which will be connected to the community’s electrical grid. It will also collect data associated with environmental and human dimension impacts. Completion will take several years.

“This site selection builds on the global reputation of Oregon State University in both renewable energy research and marine science,” said Rick Spinrad, OSU vice president for research. “Future research results from this site will help ensure our state’s leadership in these critical areas.”

The development and operation of this facility will provide jobs and other economic development as it attracts researchers and device developers to the Oregon coast from around the world, officials said. While under development, the Ocean Sentinel, NNMREC’s mobile ocean test buoy platform operating out of Toledo, will continue its work testing energy devices at its ocean test site north of Yaquina Head.

Advances in wave power technology are also one example of the growing partnerships between OSU and private industry. The university just announced a major new initiative, the Oregon State University Advantage, which includes such programs as the OSU Venture Accelerator and the Industry Partnering Program. It’s expected to help create 20 new businesses within the next five years while enhancing student education and Oregon’s economic growth.

In an extensive site selection process, NNMREC worked with four coastal communities to consider both technical criteria and community resources.  The options were narrowed last fall to Reedsport and Newport, the two communities that best matched the needed criteria for PMEC. Site selection teams from those communities submitted proposals in December.

The selection was ultimately based on ocean site characteristics, marine and on-shore cable routes, port and industry capabilities, impacts to existing ocean users, permitting challenges, stakeholder participation in the proposal process, and support of the local fishing communities.

“Both communities were committed to finding a home for PMEC,” said Kaety Hildenbrand of Oregon Sea Grant, coordinator of the site team process. “They spoke to their own strengths and demonstrated their unique assets.”

Belinda Batten, director of NNMREC, said the communities were similar in their capacities and capabilities, and the final choice focused on making PMEC a global competitor among international test facilities. All coastal communities will benefit from the growth of this industry on the Oregon coast, she said.

The Oregon Wave Energy Trust has supported PMEC and helped create a wave energy development regulatory process that meshes the needs of ocean stakeholders and the state. The agency has also helped address key points in Gov. Kitzhaber’s 10-year energy plan, including how wave energy is integrated into Oregon’s power grid while maintaining high environmental standards.

NNMREC is a partnership between OSU and University of Washington, focused on wave and tidal energy respectively, and receives a substantial part of its funding from U.S. Department of Energy. NNMREC operates a non-grid connected wave energy testing facility in Newport north of Yaquina Head and supports intermediate scale device testing in Puget Sound and Lake Washington. PMEC will complete the wave energy device test facilities.

This story is available online: http://bit.ly/Xzq4zo

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Presidential Proclamation — National Oceans Month, 2012

NATIONAL OCEANS MONTH, June 2012

- – - – - – -
BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
A PROCLAMATION

Our oceans help feed our Nation, fuel our economic engine, give mobility to our Armed Forces, and provide a place for rest and recreation. Healthy oceans, coasts, and waterways are among our most valuable resources — driving growth, creating jobs, and supporting businesses across America. During National Oceans Month, we reaffirm our commitment to the oceans and celebrate the myriad benefits they bring to all Americans.

From tourism and fishing to international commerce and renewable energy production, coastal and waterside communities help maintain vital sectors of our Nation’s economy. Yet, while our livelihoods are inseparable from the health of these natural systems, our oceans are under threat from pollution, coastal development, overfishing, and climate change. That is why I established our first ever comprehensive National Ocean Policy. The Policy lays out a science-based approach to conservation and management, and brings together Federal, State, local, and tribal governments with all those who have a stake in our oceans, coasts, and the Great Lakes — including recreational and commercial fishermen, boaters, offshore and coastal industries, environmental groups, scientists, and the public. Through the Policy, we have already expanded access to information and tools to support ocean planning efforts. Together, I am confident we will sustain these precious ecosystems and the diverse activities they support.

President John F. Kennedy once told us, “We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea — whether it is to sail or to watch it — we are going back from whence we came.” During National Oceans Month, let us celebrate our heritage as a seafaring Nation by instilling an ethic of good ocean stewardship in all Americans.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 2012 as National Oceans Month. I call upon Americans to take action to protect, conserve, and restore our oceans, coasts, and the Great Lakes.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand twelve, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-sixth.

BARACK OBAMA

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Oregon Business Opportunities 2012: Government Contracting

Businesses, do you want to win friends and influence people in government agencies? An upcoming event sponsored by the Government Contract Assistance Program can help. Plan to attend their workshop “Building Relationships and Winning Contracts with Government Agencies,” Tuesday, June 12 from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm at the Salem Conference Center in Salem. Cost for the workshop is $55. For schedule details and registration information, click here.

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Science Pub: Wind and Wave Energy

Corvallis’ Science Pub series continues with an installment focused on marine renewable energy. Belinda Batten of the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center will discuss ongoing research into wave energy under way in Oregon and elsewhere. “We’ve got the technical side, the environmental side and the outreach to communities through Oregon Sea Grant. You don’t have that everywhere,” she says. Engineered systems, she adds, will need to survive extreme ocean conditions and minimize impact on the environment and traditional ocean uses.

NNMREC is a collaborative effort of Oregon State University and the University of Washington. Oregon Sea Grant is involved in the Center’s work through its ongoing public outreach and engagement efforts on the Oregon Coast.

Held on the second Monday of the month, 6 to 8 p.m. in the Old World Deli, 341 2nd St. in Corvallis, Science Pub is sponsored by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, the Downtown Corvallis Association and OSU’s Terra magazine. Admission is free; food and drink are available to purchase.

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